A person with autism feels love, happiness, sadness and pain just like everyone else. Just because some of them may not express their feelings in the same way others do, does not mean at all that they do not have feelings - THEY DO!! It is crucial that the Myth - Autistic people have no feelings - is destroyed. The myth is a result of ignorance, not some conspiracy. Therefore, it is important that you educate people who carry this myth in a helpful and informative way.

There are five Autism Spectrum Disorders, sometimes called Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD):

  • PDD-NOS (Pervasive Developmental Delay - Not Otherwise Specified).
  • Autism (sometimes referred to as Classic Autism, Early Infantile Autism, Childhood Autism, or Autistic Disorder)
  • Asperger Syndrome
  • Rett Syndrome
  • Childhood Disintegrative Disorder
    There are five Autism Spectrum Disorders


    Read more: Autism Spectrum Disorders

If your child is two months old, you should consider talking to your doctor if your child exhibits the following behavior:

  •  Doesn't respond to loud sounds
  •  Doesn't watch things as they move
  •  Doesn't smile at people
  •  Doesn't bring his/her hands to mouth
  •  Can't hold his/her head up when pushing up on tummy

If your child is four months old, you should consider talking to your doctor if your child exhibits the following behavior:

  •  Doesn't watch things as they move
  •  Doesn't smile at people
  •  Can't hold his/her head steady
  •  Doesn't make sounds or coo
  •  Doesn't bring things to his/her mouth Read more: Signs of Autism

When people refer to "Autism" today, they are usually talking about Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), which are five complex, brain-based disorders that affect a person's behavior as well as social and communication skills. Many people with ASDs also have unusual ways of learning, paying attention, and reacting to different sensations. The thinking and learning abilities of people with ASDs can vary—from gifted to severely challenged. An ASD begins before the age of 3 and lasts throughout a person's life."
Autism affects the brain and makes communicating and interacting with other people (chatting, playing, hanging out, or socializing with others) more difficult.
People on the autism spectrum often have trouble talking and understanding language from an early age. It can be hard for them to play games and understand the rules when they are kids. As they become teens, people on the autism spectrum might have trouble understanding what clothes are cool to wear, or how to play sports, or how to just hang out and talk.

Read more: What is Autism ?